8 years ago
dfc2soft
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I know they served in WW2 but don't know their designations. Who were they and where did they serve (i.e. battles and campaigns)? It seems they never got the credit for their sacrifice.

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8 years ago
juanorez
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Chris, the larger units were the 92nd and 93rd Infantry Divisions, the 2nd Cavalry Division, the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 761 Tank Battalion. Blacks also served in the Navy and Marine Corps., but all branches of the service were still segregated in WWII. Roosevelt began the intigration process with his Executive order 9279, which eliminated restrictions on black volunteers, though Truman was the man who actually ended segregation in the military. I have the combat narratives of the two infantry divisions if you would like them, the 2nd Cavalry was disbanded in North Africa before it saw combat. The 99th Fighter Squadron was the Tuskegee Airmen. They performed very well in North Africa and Italy. The 761 Tank Battalion was commended for its service in the Ardennes campaign. The 614th Tank Destroyer Battalion, which fought in Europe, was awarded 8 Silver Stars, 28 Bronze Stars and 79 Purple Hearts. During the Battle of the Bulge, when there was an acute shortage of riflemen, blacks from the Service of Supply units were used as replacements with very positive results. Their good conduct and fighting ability was a big factor in Trumans desegregation steps. There is an old saying that there is no such thing as a racist or an aethiest in a foxhole.

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8 years ago
angiras
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My Dad served in artillery with 85th Custer Division as a Forward Observer. He was called to support the 92nd Buffalo Division(****) during the German counterattack. The 92nd arrived at the front sometime in Dec 1944 and the Germans attacked along this weak front in operation WINTERGEWITTER on Dec 26(which was unrelated to the Ardennes offensive). He told stories of troops come streaming to the rear in pursuit by Germans using their captured tanks & equipment. He spotted for them for awhile and spent Christmas day in Lucca before returning to the 85th sector.

Steve C~

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8 years ago
rbartram
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A good source is the following link to the US Army's Center of Military History:
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/topics/afam/afam-usa.htm

Jeff J.

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